GEMMS: Gateway to Early Modern Manuscript Sermons

User's Guide



SEARCHING THE DATABASE

GEMMS has both a full-text (basic) search and an advanced search.

The full-text search allows users to search for words, phrases or numbers in Manuscript, Sermon and Sermon Report records. Use ‘and’ or ‘or’ to refine your search. Use ‘*’ for a wildcard. Blank spaces are treated as ‘and’.

The advanced search allows users to search a number of fields in either Sermons or Sermon Reports. Users can combine as many fields as they want, but the more fields used, the greater the chance that the search will yield no results.

Users can sort any of the results by clicking on the headings of the columns. For example, Sermons can be sorted by ‘Title’, ‘Repository and Shelfmark’ or ‘Extent’.

Users can select how many results to display by choosing the number of rows from the dropdown menu beside the number of results.

Click on any item to see the full record. Click on ‘Back to Last Search’ to continue browsing a table.

To download search results, click on the ‘Download Search Results’ button beside the number of search results.

See the GEMMS Search Guide for more details.

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BROWSING THE DATABASE

To browse the database, select a table to browse at the top of the Basic Search page. Users have the option to browse Bible Books, Manuscripts, People, Places, Repositories, Sermons or Sermon Reports.

Users can sort any of the tables by clicking on the headings of the columns. For example, the People table can be sorted by ‘Last Name’, ‘First Name’, ‘Birth’ or ‘Death’ dates.

Users can select how many results to display by choosing the number of rows from the dropdown menu beside the number of results.

Click on any item to see the full record. Click on ‘Back to Last Search’ to continue browsing a table.

See the GEMMS Search Guide for more details.

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DEFINING SERMONS VERSUS SERMON REPORTS

GEMMS includes both what we have defined as ‘Sermons’ and ‘Sermon Reports’. It is possible for a manuscript to contain both sermons and sermon reports. Both sermons and sermon reports may have been written by creators (preachers and authors) or by recipients (hearers, readers, etc.). Please see our blog for a description of our sermon taxonomy (http://gemmsproject.blogspot.ca/p/gemms-sermon-taxonomy.html).

Sermons

‘Sermons’ is a broad category that includes a wide range of records of sermons, including full texts of sermons, sermon notes and outlines of the main points of sermons. Any record that notes at least the main points of a sermon is included in this category, and most of the manuscripts included in the database will contain sermons. Incomplete sermons also are included in this category as sermon fragments. Each sermon is entered as a separate record in the database.

Sermon Reports

‘Sermon Reports’ includes other types of manuscript records of sermons that only briefly mention sermons. The most common types of sermon reports are sermon diaries (which record sermons that were heard or preached and often only note the date, place, preacher and/or Biblical text of a sermon, but may also include a few sentence description of the contents of the sermon), lists of sermons (such as lists of parliamentary sermons, lists of sermons in parish registers or church books, registers of preachers) and commonplace books (which include short extracts or notes from sermons, sometimes noting the date, preacher, location and/or Biblical text of the sermon). Some sermon diaries and commonplace books contain both sermons and sermon reports because the author might have made brief mentions of most of the sermons, but included a longer description of a few sermons. Many sermon reports mention multiple sermons, but, unlike sermons, only one record is entered for each report with a brief summary of the range of sermons recorded.

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NOTES ON DATES

The ‘Creation Date’ for Manuscripts and the ‘Composition Date’ for Sermon Reports are used to give either the exact or approximate years of creation. For Sermons, Composition dates are used to provide a broad range of probable dates for undated sermons, and Preaching dates are provided when sermons are dated or it is possible to narrow the range of probable dates for sermons.

Entering dates can be challenging because some manuscripts, sermons and sermon reports are undated and can only be assigned to very broad date ranges, often based on external evidence.

'Old' or 'New' Date Reckoning

Some dates are entered by the ‘Old’ reckoning and others by the ‘New’ reckoning. This is specified beside preaching dates and people’s birth and death dates. In GEMMS, ‘Old’ or ‘New’ reckoning does not refer to the Julian and Gregorian calendar, as the Gregorian calendar was not adopted in Britain until 1752. ‘Old’ style refers to the system in which the year starts on 25 March. ‘New’ style refers to the system in which the year starts on 1 January. The date search assumes that users are entering Old style dates.

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MANUSCRIPT RECORDS

GEMMS ID

Our unique identifier for the manuscript. Please include this when citing manuscript records from GEMMS.

Manuscript Title

The titles usually are either from the repository’s catalogue or the manuscript itself. If there is not a title given in either the catalogue or the manuscript, contributors provide a descriptive title.

Shelfmark

We use the standard format for each repository when entering shelfmarks.

Creation Date

We try to provide either an exact or approximate date of creation for all manuscripts.

Contents Note

The ‘Contents Note’ field is for any notes about the contents of the manuscript, from a brief description to a detailed list of the contents.

Material Features

The ‘Material Features’ field is for notes on the physical description of the manuscript, the identity or clarity of the hand(s) in the manuscript, and any corrections, deletions or revisions in the manuscript.

Associated People

The ‘Associated People’ field primarily is used to connect manuscript owners to a manuscript. This includes the creator, such as a preacher or notetaker, of the manuscript. If we are uncertain whether a person connected to a manuscript was one of its owners, we use ‘manuscript owner?’. On occasion, other people, such as dedicatees, may be connected with a manuscript.

Provenance

The ‘Provenance’ field is for notes about the history of the manuscript, including about its creator(s) and any subsequent owners.

Acquisition

The ‘Acquisition’ field is for information about how and when the repository acquired the manuscript.

Source of Data

The ‘Source of Data’ field is used to give the name(s) of the contributor(s) of the data, or to give other sources of information, such as repository catalogues.

Sermons and Sermon Reports Contained

These are lists of sermons and sermon reports from this manuscript in GEMMS. There may be other sermons or sermon reports in the manuscript that fall outside the chronological boundaries of GEMMS.

Other Note

The ‘Other Note’ field is used to note any uncertain data, incorrect attributions, information about previous shelfmarks and any other notes contributors wish to include.

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PEOPLE RECORDS

GEMMS ID

Our unique identifier for the person. Please include this when citing people records from GEMMS.

Name

We include alternate names or spellings of names in parentheses.

Title

We include the most senior title, such as ‘Mr’, ‘Miss’, ‘Mrs’, ‘Dr’, ‘Bishop’, ‘Dean’, ‘Sir’, ‘Duke’, ‘Queen’, etc., for the person if known.

Denomination

The ‘Denomination’ field is used for people from the later seventeenth and the early eighteenth centuries when denominations became more clearly defined. Please see ‘Conventions’ below for our preferred descriptions of denominations.

Lived Dates

These may be exact or approximate dates. The ‘new’ or ‘old’ indicates what date reckoning system has been used, see ‘Notes on Dates’ above.

Linked Manuscripts, Sermons and Sermon Reports

These are lists of all the manuscripts, sermons and sermon reports associated with a person in GEMMS. The connection a person has with these items is indicated.

Associated Places

‘Associated Places’ is used to connect people with the locations of their homes, places of employment or places of study.

Source of Data

The ‘Source of Data’ field is used to give the name(s) of the contributor(s) of the data.

Bibliographical Sources Consulted

This field is used to give abbreviations or citations for the sources of biographical information for the person. These sources may include biographical dictionaries or databases, repository catalogues or other secondary sources. See our list of Abbreviations under Resources.

Other Note

This field is used to supply biographical information about a person. We also note if the identity of the person is uncertain.

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PLACE AND REPOSITORY RECORDS

Places and repositories are in separate tables in the database, but the records have the same structure.

GEMMS ID

Our unique identifier for the place or repository. Please include this when citing place or repository records from GEMMS.

Place Names and the Hierarchy of Places

We include alternate versions of names in parentheses. The place type, such as church, settlement, county, etc., is given in parentheses after the place name, and this is followed by the hierarchy of locations that contain this place. If you see that a place is contained within ‘place not identified’, this is because we have been unable to identify the precise location of the place.

We have tried to be historically accurate when entering places. This means that towns or cities are placed in their historic counties, which may be different from their current counties. For example, Bangor was historically in Caernarfonshire, but it is currently in Gwynedd. In the database, it is placed in Caernarfonshire.

Google Map

We will be entering coordinates for places gradually, which will be used to refine the Google Maps.

Location Contains and Repository Contained

These are lists of all places and repositories contained within this location in GEMMS.

Associated People

This is a list of all the people in GEMMS connected with the location because they lived, worked or studied there.

Manuscripts Housed

This is a list of all the manuscripts in GEMMS housed in a repository.

Preachings and Linked Sermon Reports

These are lists of any preachings or sermon reports that are associated with this location. These lists do not include preachings or sermon reports that are associated with places contained within this location.

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SERMON RECORDS

GEMMS ID

Our unique identifier for the sermon. Please include this when citing sermon records from GEMMS.

Title

If the sermon is given a title in the manuscript, this is the title used in GEMMS. We have kept the original spelling, but expanded any contractions. Otherwise, contributors have provided a descriptive title, generally following the format of ‘Sermon on [Biblical text]’. Descriptive titles are indicated as such beside the title.

In Manuscript

Includes the manuscript title and the shelfmark. Click on this to find out more about the manuscript.

Extent

Gives the folio or page numbers for the sermon, if known. Sometimes contributors have not included this data. We have noted if the sermon is unfoliated and unpaginated.

Autograph

This field is used to indicate whether the sermon is written in the preacher’s hand.

Composition Date

Composition dates usually are included only if there is not any information in the manuscript about when the sermon was preached. These dates are used to provide a broad range of probable dates for undated sermons, often based on external evidence.

Primary Language

This field is used to identify the primary language of a sermon, though sometimes sermons include more than one language, such as quotations in Latin or Greek.

Sermon Types

Sermons are categorized according to our sermon taxonomy:

Auditor’s Notes’: notes taken by an auditor of a sermon.

Auditor’s Outline‘: a list of the heads or main points of a sermon written by an auditor.

Preacher’s Notes’: notes written by a preacher, rather than a fully written out sermon.

Preacher’s Outline’: a list of the heads or main points of a sermon written by the preacher.

Reader’s Notes’: notes taken by a reader of a sermon.

Reader’s Outline’: a list of the heads or main points of a sermon written by a reader.

Sermon’: a sermon written out in full, though it may contain minor corrections or revisions, such as changing the occasional word or phrase. It may have been written either by the preacher or another person.

Sermon Draft’: a fully written out sermon with substantial revisions or corrections, not just changes to the occasional word or phrase. The revisions may have been made at any time, including for a subsequent preaching of a sermon. Sermon drafts will almost always have been written by the preacher, but someone else may have later revised the sermon.

Sermon Fragment’: a part of a sermon, either written by the preacher or someone else.

Sermon Notes’: notes of a sermon when it is not known whether they were written by the preacher or someone else.

Sermon Outline’: an outline of the heads or main points of a sermon when it is not known whether it was written by the preacher or someone else.

Transcription of Manuscript Sermon’: a copy of a sermon known to be transcribed from a manuscript sermon.

Transcription of Printed Sermon’: a copy of a sermon known to be transcribed from a print edition.

Transcription of Sermon (Unknown Source)’: a sermon that has been copied from another source, but it is unclear whether that source sermon was from a manuscript or a printed text.

Any uncertainties about the sermon type are noted in the ‘Other Note’ field.

Sermon Genre

The ‘Sermon genre’ field is used to provide a description of the genre or nature of the sermon. Most of the types identified relate to the sermons’ occasions, such as anniversary, charity, funeral or thanksgiving, though some of the genres relate to the content of sermons, such as devotional, instructive or reproof. Sermons may have more than one ‘Sermon genre’.

Be aware that sermon genre is an optional field in the database. In many cases, the type of a sermon is not given in a sermon record because the contributor has not read the sermon.

Many of the types are self-explanatory, such as funeral, fast, marriage, thanksgiving and visitation sermons, but here are some definitions:

Anniversary: a sermon on a political anniversary day, including the anniversaries of the monarch’s accession, birth and coronation days; of the execution of Charles I (January 30); of the Restoration of Charles II (May 29); of the Gowrie Conspiracy (August 5); of the Gunpowder Plot (and Revolution of 1688) (November 5). Contributors indicate the particular anniversary day under preaching occasions.

Charity: a sermon whose primary purpose is to encourage charity, often preached before charitable societies or to encourage support for a particular charity

Confutational: a sermon opposing doctrinal error and heresy

Farewell: a sermon preached when the preacher left his post at a place of worship

Jeremiad: a prophetic sermon examining a nation’s relationship with God

Passion: a sermon on the crucifixion of Christ

Rehearsal: a sermon that summarizes and provides commentary on the Good Friday and Spital sermons

Bible Text

Includes the Bible text(s) for a sermon, if known. If only the chapter is noted in the manuscript, all the verses for the chapter are given.

Associated People

The ‘Associated People’ field is used to connect a sermon with people, including preachers, notetakers, scribes, dedicatees, etc. Associated people are listed, along with their role that describes their relationship to the sermon. If we are uncertain that we have identified the correct person for a role, we include the role with a ‘?’, such as ‘preacher?’ or ‘scribe?’. We use ‘auditor’ for someone who attended the sermon but otherwise was not associated with the manuscript sermon; we use ‘notetaker’ for someone who takes notes on a sermon, whether they heard or read the sermon.

Associated Sermons

The ‘Associated Sermons’ field is used to connect sermons in GEMMS. It is used most frequently to link versions of the same sermon, which may either come from the same manuscript or a different manuscript. You can click on an associated sermon to view its record.

Preachings

The ‘Preachings’ field is used to record all the evidence for the dates, places and/or occasions when the sermon was preached. Some preachings will include data for all these fields, other preachings may include only data for one or two of these fields. We have tried to provide at least an approximate place of preaching, often a country or a continent, for most sermons. Occasions of preachings are often not identified, and sometimes only broad date ranges are given for preachings.

Additional Material

The ‘Additional Material’ field is used to note any relevant materials added before or after the sermon, such as a preface, dedication, prayers, etc.

Print Editions/Witnesses

Any information about printed copies or other manuscript copies of the sermon is recorded in the ‘Print Editions/Witnesses’ field. If a witness is in the database, it is included under ‘Associated Sermons’. Sometimes sermon records also include links to print editions or witnesses.

Description

The ‘Description’ field is used to add notes about the contents of the sermon; its material features, including corrections, deletions or revisions; or the hand in which it is written, including the identity or clarity of the hand.

Source of Data

The ‘Source of Data’ field is used to give the name(s) of the contributor(s) of the data, or to give other sources of information, such as repository catalogues.

Other Note

The ‘Other Note’ field is used to note any uncertain data, incorrect attributions and any other notes contributors wish to include.

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SERMON REPORT RECORDS

GEMMS ID

Our unique identifier for the sermon report. Please include this when citing sermon report records from GEMMS.

Title

If the sermon report is given a title in the manuscript, this is the title used in GEMMS. We have kept the original spelling, but expanded any contractions. Otherwise, contributors have provided a descriptive title. Descriptive titles are indicated as such beside the title.

In Manuscript

Includes the manuscript title. Click on this to find out more about the manuscript.

Extent

Gives the folio or page numbers for the sermon report, if known. Sometimes contributors have not included this data. We have noted if the sermon report is unfoliated and unpaginated.

Composition Date

Composition dates either can be the exact or approximate year(s) for the creation of the sermon report.

Primary Language

This field is used to identify the primary language of a sermon report, though sometimes reports include more than one language.

Report Types

Sermon reports are categorized according to our taxonomy:

Commonplace Book’: a compilation of various materials that includes references to sermons, short extracts from sermons, or materials used for sermons. If the author includes more than a few sentences about the contents of the sermon, that sermon is entered as a separate ‘Sermon’ record.

If the author of a commonplace book is known, the report is categorized by the type of author: ‘Auditor’s Commonplace Book’, ‘Preacher’s Commonplace Book’, or ‘Reader’s Commonplace Book’. Otherwise, the generic category, ‘Commonplace Book’ is used.

Letter(s)’: a letter or series of related letters that provide a brief description of or mention a sermon or sermons.

List of Sermons‘: any sort of list of sermons preached, including lists in parish registers, church books and minute books; lists of parliamentary sermons; registers of preachers, etc.

Note of Sermon(s)’: any mention of sermon(s) that does not fit into the other categories, such as a note about sermons missing from a manuscript; or a note about the occasion of, audience for, text of, etc. a different sermon at the end of a manuscript sermon.

Sermon Diary’: a diary, journal or notebook that provides brief descriptions of sermons. Often all that is noted is the place, date, the preacher and/or Biblical text of the sermon. If the author includes more than a few sentences about the contents of a sermon, that sermon is entered as a separate ‘Sermon’ record.

If the author of a sermon diary is known, the report is categorized by the type of author: ‘Auditor’s Sermon Diary’, ‘Preacher’s Sermon Diary’, or ‘Reader’s Sermon Diary’. Otherwise, the generic category, ‘Sermon Diary’ is used. A diary may be of more than one type. For example, a diary written by a preacher may record his own sermons and sermons he heard, and this diary would be categorized as a ‘Preacher’s Sermon Diary’ and an ‘Auditor’s Sermon Diary’.

Any uncertainties about the report type are noted in the ‘Other Note’ field.

Bible Text

If there is one or two ‘Bible Texts’ associated with a sermon report, they are included in the record. If the sermon report mentions more than a few Bible texts, no Bible texts are associated with the report. If only the chapter is noted in the manuscript, all the verses for the chapter are given.

Associated People

The ‘Associated People’ field is used to connect a report with people, including preachers, notetakers, authors of letters, subjects of sermons, etc. Associated people are listed, along with their role that describes their relationship to the report. If we are uncertain that we have identified the correct person for a role, we include the role with a ‘?’, such as ‘preacher?’ or ‘notetaker?’. We use ‘auditor’ for someone who attended the sermon but otherwise was not associated with the manuscript; we use ‘notetaker’ for someone who takes notes for a report, whether they heard or read the sermon.

Contributors may add as many people as they want to a sermon report, and reports often include more than one preacher. However, if there are numerous preachers mentioned in the report, only the most frequently noted preachers are associated with the report.

Linked Places

The ‘Linked Places’ field is used to connect sermon reports to places, primarily places where sermons were preached. Contributors may add as many places as they want to a sermon report. However, if there are numerous places mentioned in the report, only the most frequently noted places are linked to the report.

Primary Editions/Witnesses

Any information about printed copies or other manuscript copies of the sermon report is recorded in the ‘Print Editions/Witnesses’ field. Sometimes report records also include links to print editions or witnesses.

Description

The ‘Description’ field is used to add notes about the contents of the sermon report; its material features, including corrections, deletions or revisions; or the hand in which it is written, including the identity or clarity of the hand. Report records often note the range of data included in the report, such as the most frequently mentioned preachers or types of preachers, the most frequently mentioned places and the range of dates covered.

Source of Data

The ‘Source of Data’ field is used to give the name(s) of the contributor(s) of the data, or to give other sources of information, such as repository catalogues.

Other Note

The ‘Other Note’ field is used to note any uncertain data, incorrect attributions and any other notes contributors wish to include.

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CONVENTIONS FOR DATA ENTRY

Biblical Text

The preferred format for Biblical texts is: ‘Bible book’ ‘chapter number’:’verse number’, i.e. ‘Hebrews 10:31’. Names of Bible books are written out in full.

If there is a series of sermons on the same Biblical text, the sermons are numbered in the title, i.e. ‘Sermon 1 on [Biblical text] …, ‘Sermon 2 on…’.

Denominations

The preferred categories for people from England and Wales are: ‘Church of England’; ‘Church of England – nonjuror’; ‘Roman Catholic’; other Protestants pre-1660: Presbyterian, Congregationalist, Baptist, Quaker; other Protestants 1660 onwards: ‘Dissenter’, ‘Dissenter – Presbyterian’, ‘Dissenter – Congregationalist’, ‘Dissenter – Baptist’, ‘Dissenter – Quaker’. Independents are categorized as ‘Congregationalists’.

The preferred categories for people from Scotland are: ‘Presbyterian’, ‘Presbyterian – Coventanter’, ‘Episcopalian’, ‘Roman Catholic’, ‘Quaker’, ‘Baptist’, ‘Congregationalist’. Members of the Church of Scotland, are categorized either as ‘Episcopalian’ (from 1660-1689) or ‘Presbyterian’ (post 1688/9).

The preferred categories for people from Ireland are: ‘Church of Ireland’, ‘Roman Catholic’, ‘Dissenter’, ‘Dissenter – Presbyterian, ‘Dissenter – Congregationalist’, ‘Dissenter – Baptist’, ‘Dissenter – Quaker’.

The preferred categories for people from the North American colonies are: ‘Congregationalist’, ‘Baptist’, ‘Quaker’, ‘Episcopalian’, ‘Presbyterian’, ‘Roman Catholic’.

Extent

The preferred format is ‘ff. 2r-10v’ or ‘pp. 12-24’. If there is no foliation or pagination, this is noted as ‘unfoliated and unpaginated,’ usually with a note about the number of pages.

For a sermon written in reverse in manuscript, the folio or page numbers is given in ascending order with a note that it was ‘written in reverse’. If the sermon was written only on one side of the folios, this also is noted. For example, ‘pp. 146-161 (written in reverse)’ or ‘ff. 151v-159v (versos only, written in reverse)’.

False Attribution

If later scholars have identified that a manuscript or sermon has been falsely attributed to a person, that person is not linked to the manuscript or sermon(s). Instead, this false attribution is noted in the ‘Other Note’ field of either the manuscript or sermon(s). If the attribution is uncertain but not definitively shown to be false, the person is linked to the manuscript with a ‘?’ for the role.

Handling Uncertain Data

If there is an uncertain occasion, the occasion will include a ‘?’. For example, ‘Sunday?’. Uncertain places are noted in the ‘Other Note’ or the preaching ‘Note’ field.

If there is uncertainty about a person linked to a sermon, their role will include a ‘?’. For example, if we have a possible attribution for a preacher, he is included with ‘preacher?’ for the person role. There also will often be a note about this uncertainty in the ‘Other Note’ field for Manuscripts, Sermons or Sermon Reports.

If there are uncertain dates, we include a range of approximate dates. If a date is unclear in the manuscript or otherwise problematic, this is noted in the ‘Other Note’ or ‘Notes’ field. For uncertain dates that require a day, month and year, we have used the following conventions. If we only know the month, the date range is given as that entire month, i.e. ‘1698-05-01 – 1698-05-31’. If we only know the year, the date range is given as that entire year, i.e. ‘1650-03-25 – 1650-03-24.’ If we know the approximate decade, the date range is given as that entire decade, i.e. ‘1700-03-25 – 1709-03-24’.

Manuscript Titles

The titles usually are either from the repository’s catalogue or the manuscript itself. If there is not a title given in either the catalogue or the manuscript, contributors provide a descriptive title.

Occasions

Some occasions are called by multiple names. Here is a list of preferred occasions used in GEMMS:

‘Easter Sunday’, ‘Easter Monday’, ‘Easter Tuesday’, ‘Easter Wednesday’: we specify the day of Easter week the sermon was preached, if possible

‘Epiphany’: used for the occasion of the Feast of the Epiphany

‘Fast’: used for the occasion of Solemn Fast

‘Preparation to communion’: used for the occasions of Communion, Sacrament, & Preparation to sacrament

‘Whitsunday’: used for the occasion of Pentecost

Place Names

For churches, we use ‘St’ instead of ‘St.’. We use ‘St Mary’ instead of ‘St Mary’s’ because we do not include ‘church’ in the name, unless the name would not make sense without it, such as ‘Christ Church’.

However, we do indicate in its name if the church is of a special kind, such as a chapel or a cathedral, and capitalize this term, i.e. ‘Salisbury Cathedral’. In this case, we sometimes have used the possessive, such as ‘St Paul’s Cathedral’ or ‘St George’s Chapel’.

For chapels in institutions or other buildings (such as royal palaces, inns of court, university colleges, etc.), we give the name of the chapel with its associated place and include the institution it is contained within. For example, Place Name: Gray’s Inn Chapel, Contained within: Gray’s Inn; or Place Name: Whitehall Palace Chapel Royal, Contained within: Whitehall Palace.

Nonconformists’ meetinghouses often were named based on the street where they were located. In London, the meetinghouses often were identified by two streets, the street where they were located and an adjacent major street (such as Hare Court, Aldersgate Street), or by the name of the building and the street (such as Girdlers' Hall, Basinghall Street). In these cases, we have included both streets, or the name of the building and the street as the name of the meetinghouse.

Sermon Titles

If the sermon is given a title in the manuscript, this is the title used in GEMMS. We have kept the original spelling, but expanded any contractions.

If the sermon is not given a title, contributors provide a descriptive title, generally following the format of ‘Sermon on [Biblical text]’. Descriptive titles are indicated as such beside the title. If the Biblical text of the sermon is unknown, contributors provide some other description of the sermon or use the title ‘Sermon on unidentified text’.

If there is more than one sermon in the manuscript on the same Biblical text, the sermons are numbered in the title, i.e. ‘Sermon 1 on…, ‘Sermon 2 on…’. If there is more than one version of the same sermon in a manuscript, this is indicated in the title, i.e. ‘First draft of sermon on….’, ‘Notes for sermon on…’, ‘Outline for sermon on…’, ‘Final draft of sermon on…’, etc.

Shelfmarks

We use the standard format for each repository when entering shelfmarks.

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